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ThermoDome Thermodilution Cardiac Output Catheter

Technology #20160325

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Complete assemblyThermocouple output; laser drilled holes at distal end
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Researchers
Demetri Yannopoulos, MD
Professor of Medicine, Cardiology
External Link (www.dom.umn.edu)
Managed By
Kevin Anderson
Technology Licensing Officer 612-624-8293
Patent Protection

US Patent Pending US-2017-0333671

Shortened distance to measure cardiac output

The ThermoDome thermodilution cardiac output catheter significantly shortens the distance needed to measure cardiac output. Its unique design features multiple laser drilled holes at the distal end of the catheter. These holes create a mixing cloud that forces the body of the catheter to the center of the lumen and fully distributes cold saline in all directions. The technology consists of three main components:

  • Injection Catheter. The cardiac catheter comes in two versions: either with or without a balloon inflatable tip.
  • Thermocouple Catheter. This catheter consists of a main body connected to a 3D printed handle where micro-thermocouple connectors inserted in the back can exit through the nose.
  • Software and Thermocouple Analysis. Change in thermocouple microvoltages are used in the Stewart Hamilton equation to calculate cardiac output.

Addresses drawbacks during low flow states

While thermodilution has been used to measure cardiac output for years, it is too inaccurate during low flow states (e.g., times of advanced circulatory support such as ECMO, and significant tricuspid/valvular regurgitation back into the atrium). This new catheter and thermocouple design addresses these issues by reducing/eliminating effects of significant tricuspid regurgitation, accurately measuring cardiac output when parallel circuits are present, evaluating cardiac output during percutaneous pulmonic valve implantation and accurately measuring shunt fractions, particularly right to left shunts.

Phase of Development

  • Prototype developed. Limited animal studies in progress.

Benefits

  • Shortens distance needed to measure cardiac output
  • Accurately measures cardiac output when parallel circuits are present (advanced circulatory support) such as ECMO, LVAD, and right heart augmentation devices
  • Reduces effects of significant tricuspid regurgitation
  • Accurately measures shunt fractions, particularly right to left shunts

Features

  • Features multiple laser drilled holes at the distal end of the catheter
  • Mixing cloud fully distributes cold saline in all directions
  • Evaluates cardiac output during percutaneous pulmonic valve implantation.

Applications

  • Monitoring cardiac output
  • LVAD, hemodynamic support and ECMO
  • Critically ill cardiac patients (e.g., those on ECMO or other hemodynamic support; those with very low cardiac output, a significant shunt, or significant tricuspid regurgitation, or those undergoing pulmonary valve implant through percutaneous means)


Interested in Licensing?
The University relies on industry partners to further develop and ultimately commercialize this technology. The license is for the sale, manufacture or use of products claimed by the patents. Please contact Kevin Anderson to share your business needs and licensing and technical interest in this technology.