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Tracking Deformation of Organs during Minimally Invasive Surgery

Technology #20090032

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During training, 3D organ surfaces obtained from MRI or CT scans can be represented using SH expansions; SH coefficients of an organ surface lie in specific low dimensional subspacesSH coefficients corresponding to the subspace can be reconstructedReconstruction method
Categories
Researchers
Ahmed Tewfik, PhD
Chair of the Department, Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin
Managed By
Andrew Morrow
Technology Licensing Officer
Patent Protection
US Patent 10,026,016
Publications
Sparse Representation of Deformable 3D Organs with Spherical Harmonics and Structured Dictionary
International Journal of Biomedical Imaging, Volume 2011, Article ID 658930, 17 pages


Real-time, 3D view of organs as they deform during surgery

A new algorithm tracks exterior and interior surfaces of organs to provide a surgeon with a real-time, 3D view of organs as they deform. The 3-D reconstruction allows the surgeon to “see” through the wall of an organ during surgery rather than just look at its surface. The algorithm is based on sparse sampling of the exterior surfaces tracked by identifying subspaces in which the coefficients of spherical harmonic representations of the surfaces live. It uses pre-operative CT/MRI scans during training and needlescopic images acquired during tracking. Viewing live tissue deformation allows the surgeon to track the 3-D reconstructed image and guide surgical intervention. This technology will realize the promises of minimally invasive procedures (e.g., NOTES, single-port laparoscopy, biopsies, etc.) while effectively mitigating the risks associated with the limited field of view available to the surgeon.

Eliminates risks and drawbacks of single port interventions

Existing technology cannot track 3D organs during surgery using needlescopic incisions. Procedures that minimize the size and number of incisions should reduce hospitalization time, lower complication rates, and ultimately reduce the morbidity and mortality from surgery. However, limiting the surgeon’s field of view may increase the risk of complications. This new technology provides the surgeon with a view of the organs as they deform during the surgery, thereby eliminating the major drawback of single port interventions. It provides the first-ever real-time interior organ surface reconstruction using sparse sampling of exterior surfaces with error rate as low as 0.095%. When the algorithm was applied in 3D cardiac frame interpolation, it showed an error rate of only 1.15% and reduced the radiation exposure by 90%.

Phase of Development

  • Prototype developed

Benefits

  • Provides real-time, 3D view of organs as they deform in surgery
  • Low error rate (as low as 0.095%)
  • Eliminates risks and drawbacks of single port interventions
  • Reduces the radiation rate

Features

  • Tracks exterior and interior surfaces of organs
  • Algorithm based on sparse sampling of the exterior surfaces
  • Uses pre-operative CT or MRI scans and needlescopic images acquired during tracking
  • Tracks the 3-D reconstructed image and guides surgical intervention

Applications

  • Surgeries using needlescopic incisions
  • Guiding surgical intervention
  • Tracking 3-D reconstructed images


Interested in Licensing?
The University relies on industry partners to integrate software for commercial purposes. The license is available for this technology and would be for the integration, sale, manufacture or use of products claimed by the issued patent. Please contact Andrew Morrow to share your business needs and technical interest in this technology and if you are interested in licensing the technology for further research and development.